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Wearable device measures cortisol in sweat

By drawing in a bit of sweat, a patch can reveal how much cortisol a person is producing. Cortisol is known as the stress hormone but is involved in many important physiological functions.

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World’s fastest human-made spinning object could help study quantum mechanics

Researchers have created the fastest human-made spinning object in the world, which they believe will help them study material science, quantum mechanics and the properties of vacuum.

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New material: Two faces offer limitless possibilities

Named for the mythical god with two faces, Janus membranes — double-sided membranes that serve as gatekeepers between two substances — have emerged as a material with potential industrial uses.

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New study shows certain video games can improve health in children with obesity

A new study showed for the first time that video games, in combination with fitness coaching and a step tracker, helped overweight children lose weight, lower their blood pressure and cholesterol and increase their physical activity.

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Protecting autonomous grids from potentially crippling GPS spoofing attacks

Not long ago, getting a virus was about the worst thing computer users could expect in terms of system vulnerability. But in our current age of hyper-connectedness and the emerging Internet of Things, that’s no longer the case. With connectivity, a new…

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New solar sailing technology for NASA

Researchers is taking solar sailing to the next level with advanced photonic materials. This new class of materials could be used to steer reflected or transmitted photons and enable near-Earth, interplanetary and interstellar space travel.

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Traveling to the sun: Why won’t Parker Solar Probe melt?

This summer, NASA’s Parker Solar Probe will launch to travel closer to the Sun, deeper into the solar atmosphere, than any mission before it. Cutting-edge technology and engineering will help it beat the heat.

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Physics treasure hidden in a wallpaper pattern

An international team of scientists has discovered a new, exotic form of insulating material with a metallic surface that could enable more efficient electronics or even quantum computing. The researchers developed a new method for analyzing existing c…

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Relaxor ferroelectrics: Relax, just break it

Scientists are helping to answer long-held questions about a technologically important class of materials called relaxor ferroelectrics.

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New battery could store wind and solar electricity affordably and at room temperature

A new type of flow battery that involves a liquid metal more than doubled the maximum voltage of conventional flow batteries and could lead to affordable storage of renewable power.

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Mobile phone radiation may affect memory performance in adolescents, study finds

Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields may have adverse effects on the development of memory performance of specific brain regions exposed during mobile phone use, suggests a recent study involving nearly 700 adolescents in Switzerland.

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Targeting headaches and tumors with nano-submarines

Scientists have developed a new method to enable miniature drug-filled nanocarriers to dock on to immune cells, which in turn attack tumors.

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Deepwater Horizon oil spill: Oil biodegradation inhibited in deep-sea sediments

Degradation rates of oil were slower in the dark and cold waters of the depths of the Gulf of Mexico than at surface conditions, according to an international team of geoscientists trying to understand where the oil went during the Deepwater Horizon oi…

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Scientists use satellites to measure vital underground water resources

With the hope of providing water resource managers with better tools to help keep aquifers healthy, a team of scientists are using the latest space technology to look underneath Earth’s surface to measure this precious natural resource.

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Moving closer to completely optical artificial neural network

Researchers have shown that it is possible to train artificial neural networks directly on an optical chip.

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Methods to quantify the yips and golfer’s cramp

Almost every golfer knows the feeling. Minutes after a picture-perfect drive down the fairway, a cascade of inexplicable missed putts leads to a disappointing triple bogey.

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Future electronic components to be printed like newspapers

A new manufacturing technique uses a process similar to newspaper printing to form smoother and more flexible metals for making ultrafast electronic devices.

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Computer model predicts how fracturing metallic glass releases energy at the atomic level

Metallic glasses are an exciting research target, but the difficulties associated with predicting how much energy these materials release when they fracture is slowing down development of metallic glass-based products. Recently, researchers developed a…

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A social tool for evaluating the environmental impact of residential buildings

for the first time, an open-source computing tool can, simply and intuitively, calculate the CO2 emissions in each phase of a building project, in order to obtain a global picture of its carbon footprint from its conception and to help decide every var…

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Engineers develop world’s most efficient semiconductor for thermal management

Working to address ‘hotspots’ in computer chips that degrade their performance, engineers have developed a new semiconductor material, defect-free boron arsenide, that is more effective at drawing and dissipating waste heat than any other known semicon…

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Puzzling results explained: A multiband approach to Coulomb drag and indirect excitons

A new theoretical study explains previous mystifying experimental results, in which coupled charged particles moved in exactly the opposite direction to that predicted. This apparently contradictory phenomenon is associated with the bandgap in dual-lay…

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CALET succeeds in direct measurements of cosmic-ray electron spectrum up to 4.8 TeV

Researchers have succeeded in the direct, high-precision measurements of cosmic-ray electron spectrum up to 4.8 TeV, based on observations with the Calorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET). Observations by CALET are expected to reveal the mysteries of c…

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Scientists develop proteins that self-assemble into supramolecular complexes

Scientists have designed new proteins that can self-assemble into the complex structures underlying biological organisms, laying the groundwork for leading-edge applications in biotechnology. The researchers created and developed the proteins with a sp…

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Reversing cause and effect is no trouble for quantum computers

Scientists show that a quantum computer is less in thrall to the arrow of time than a classical computer.

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Robots working as a group are able to determine the optimal order of their tasks

Could robots soon help rescue crews save the survivors of a natural disaster? Such a mission would require that the robots be able to determine, on their own, which tasks to perform and in what order to perform them. Researchers have shown, for the fir…

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Low-cost formulas in the manufacturing of non-stick food molds

There is good news for amateur bakers of cakes, muffins and pastries made in extravagant shapes and small and medium-sized baking businesses. Molds will cease to be a problem if the system designed by a research group progresses. This system manufactur…

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NASA’s new mini satellite will study Milky Way’s halo

A new mission called HaloSat will help scientists search for the universe’s missing matter by studying X-rays from hot gas surrounding the Milky Way galaxy.

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Metal too ‘gummy’ to cut? Draw on it with a Sharpie or glue stick, science says

Your everyday permanent markers, glue sticks and packing tape may offer a surprisingly low-tech solution to a long-standing nuisance in the manufacturing industry: Making soft and ductile, or so-called ‘gummy’ metals easier to cut.

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Billion-year-old lake deposit yields clues to Earth’s ancient biosphere

A sample of ancient oxygen, teased out of a 1.4-billion-year-old evaporative lake deposit in Ontario, provides fresh evidence of what the Earth’s atmosphere and biosphere were like during the interval leading up to the emergence of animal life.

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